The Randolph-Sheppard Act (“RSA”) grants blind persons, operating through State Licensing Agencies, mandatory priority in the award of contracts for the operation of vending facilities on federal property so long as the SLA contractor satisfies criteria established by the RSA’s implementing regulations prescribed by the U.S. Secretary of Education.  In its recent decision in State of Texas v. United Statesthe Court of Federal Claims (“COFC”) made two key rulings in relation to the RSA:

  1. Prior Government Accountability Office (“GAO”) decisions related to the RSA are not persuasive on the COFC, as GAO lacked jurisdiction to hear these protests, and
  2. The RSA creates a two pronged test before granting a State Licensing Agency (“SLA”) priority in a solicitation for vending services — (i) the SLA must be within the procurement’s competitive range, and (ii) the the contracting agency must perform cost and food quality evaluations pursuant to the solicitation, which may be in addition to a determination of whether the proposal falls within the competitive range.

In State of Texas v. United States, the Air Force issued a solicitation for vending services at Joint Base San Antonio.  The State of Texas, acting by and through one its state agencies that qualified as a SLA under the RSA for the purposes of the procurement, submitted a proposal.  The Air Force originally found that the State of Texas’ proposal did not fall within the competitive range.  In response to being excluded from the competitive range, the State of Texas filed for arbitration with the U.S. Department of Education, as is required by the RSA.


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Earlier this year, the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives passed different versions of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (“FY 2018 NDAA”).  The Senate version contained dramatic bid protest reforms that, with the exception of the reforms to debriefing, were largely unpopular in the government contracting community.  The House version did not contain these reforms.  After meeting in conference over the past month to iron out the differences between the two bills, on Nov. 8, 2017, the House and Senate Armed Services Committees announced an agreement had been reached.  Contractors can breathe a sigh of relief, as most (if not all) of the protest reforms that the contracting community viewed negatively were left out of the bill agreed to in conference.
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Under the National Defense Authorization Acts (NDAAs), Congress provides legislation on various aspects of how the Department of Defense (DOD) defines and purchases commercial items. In July, Government Accountability Office (GAO) released a study on detailing (1) trends in the DOD’s acquisition of commercial items; and (2) recent NDAA changes from fiscal years 2013-2017 related to procurement of commercial items and actions taken by DOD in response to this legislation.

The Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994, of course, established a preference within the federal government to procure commercial items rather than items developed exclusively for the government.  “Commercial items” are generally defined as products and services readily available in the commercial marketplace. Purchasing commercial items enables the DOD to participate in the commercial marketplace (when appropriate) and to take advantage of market innovations and reduce its acquisition costs. Despite this preference, the GAO study shows the DOD has been slow to embrace the preference to buy commercial items – but why? 
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With every new administration, there is both great uncertainty and opportunity in federal government contracting. To help you navigate the rough seas of doing business with the federal government in this new administration, we have assembled nationally recognized practitioners who will cover topics relevant to government contractors large and small, novice and seasoned. Session topics

272546436_4edcb4b3e0_bPresident Trump has signed Executive Order 13767 that directs a wall to be built on the Mexico-United States border.  The Department of Homeland Security has sought proposals to design and build a prototype of the border wall, and many contractors have submitted offers.  At the same time, several state and local governments (such as New York City, San Francisco, Berkeley, Oakland, New York, Illinois, and California) are considering or proposing legislation to prohibit contractors working on the border wall from contracting with that state/local government. These contractor “sanctions” are a complex, untested issue, and contractors bidding, or considering working, on the border wall project need to know that the issue is now in play. Such legislation, if adopted by a state/local government, will raise constitutional issues.  Aside from due process and equal protection issues, there are at least two relevant U.S. Constitution clauses both of which may ultimately doom any proposed state/local legislation to sanction border wall contractors: the Supremacy Clause and the Dormant Commerce Clause.
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In what appears to be the first litigation concerning “intergovernmental support agreements” (IGSA), the Government Accountability Office (GAO) in Red River Waste Solutions, Inc., B-414367 (March 21, 2017) declared that it has jurisdiction to review the award of IGSAs (in this particular case an IGSA for garbage collection services).

Section 331 of National Defense Authorization Act for FY 2013 (FY2013 NDAA) authorized a public-public partnership mechanism called “intergovernmental support agreements” (IGSA). Specifically, the Department of Defense (DoD) agencies “may enter into an [IGSA], on a sole source basis, with a State or local government to provide, receive, or share installation-support services if the Secretary determines that the agreement will serve the best interests of the department by enhancing mission effectiveness or creating efficiencies or economies of scale, including by reducing costs.” However, IGSA’s may only be used when the “State or local government … providing the installation-support services already provides such services for its own use.” Furthermore, the FY2013 NDAA also requires that any underlying contract used by the State or local government to provide the installation-support services must be awarded on a competitive basis.

In the Red River Waste Solutions case, Red River protested the Army’s award of an IGSA to Vernon Parish, Louisiana, to provide garbage collection services at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The Army awarded Vernon Parish an IGSA to perform garbage collection at the Fort Polk, and in turn Vernon Parish extended its existing contract for garbage collection in Vernon Parish (with Progressive Waste Solutions of Louisiana) to also cover garbage collection at Fort Polk.

Red River argued that the Army’s award of the IGSA to Vernon Parish was “contrary to the ‘enabling statute’ that authorizes the award of IGSAs” because (1) Vernon Parish did not already provide the services being procured, and (2) because Vernon Parish had not conducted a competition under which Red River could compete for the required services. While GAO ultimately dismissed the protest as untimely, GAO’s decision provided several important take-aways for future procurements involving IGSAs:
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4635056311_30c140df8f_oIn these early days of Donald Trump’s administration, domestic sourcing requirements are receiving heightened focus.  President Trump’s Jan. 24, 2017, “Presidential Memorandum Regarding Construction of American Pipelines” asks the Secretary of Commerce to “develop a plan under which all new pipelines . . . inside the borders of the United States . . . use materials and equipment produced in the United States, to the maximum extent possible and to the extent permitted by law.”  Yet, when a company is asked to certify to its customer that its products comply with domestic content law, the answer is rarely straightforward.  Contractors should therefore be proactive and review the Buy America and the Buy American Acts.  The penalties for non-compliance are serious and include civil or criminal False Claims Act violations, suspension or debarment, contract terminations and other claims against a contractor by the Government.

Buy America Act

The Buy America Act is the popular name for a group of domestic content restrictions that attach to specific funds administered by the Department of Transportation (DOT).  The Buy America provision of the Surface Transportation Assistance Act of 1982, 23 U.S.C. § 313, state that the Secretary of Transportation “shall not obligate any funds authorized to be appropriated to carry out the Surface Transportation Assistance Act . . . unless steel, iron, and manufactured products used in such project are produced in the United States.”  These funds are used to make grants to states and other non-federal government entities for various transportation purposes. 
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logo-titleBack in October 2016, we wrote about the Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces rule (commonly known as the contractor “Blacklisting” rule) and how its implementation had been temporarily halted by a federal court in Texas.  The Blacklisting rule would have allowed agencies to essentially debar contractors on a contract-by-contract basis if a contractor had a labor law violation on its record.  Many in the contracting community lobbied hard against this rule, arguing (among other things) that the Blacklisting rule would put contractors at risk of inconsistent disqualification from procurements without the same due process rights that go along with agency suspension and debarment programs.  Well, it now looks like Congress has decided to step in and flex a rarely used law to get rid of the Blacklisting rule for good.

Today, by a vote of 236-187, the House of Representatives passed a disapproval resolution pursuant to the Congressional Review Act to repeal the Blacklisting rule.  
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Trump_signing_order_January_27President Trump’s Executive Orders have been front page news for the past week, many of which have been quite controversial. Yesterday the President issued another Executive Order that, although unlikely to garner major media buzz, may be the most impactful yet for government contractors. The Presidential Executive Order on Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs, which some have referred to as the “Two-for-One” Order, is aimed at reducing the number of regulations across the federal government. The gist of the Order is that for every one new regulation that an executive branch agency proposes, it must repeal two existing regulations. In addition, the agency’s estimated cost of any new regulations must be offset by reductions in cost by repeal of existing regulations.

The Order makes exceptions for regulations pertaining to the “military, national security, or foreign affairs function of the United States,” “regulations related to agency organization, management, or personnel,” and any other category of regulations exempted by the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (“OMB”).

The problem with this Order is that its terms are vague, and the person charged with providing additional guidance on the Order has yet to be confirmed by the Senate.
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16064489288_1323da98f9_k (1)Two pieces of federal legislation that  recently became law will have a major impact on government contractors seeking to protest Department of Defense (DoD) and Civilian Agencies task order awards.  Some changes are for the worse, others are for the better.  However, the best news for contractors is probably that some of the changes that